Locavore

Locavore

From Farmers' Fields to Rooftop Gardens - How Canadians Are Changing the Way We Eat

Book - 2010
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HARPERCOLL

Strawberries in January, fresh tomatoes year-round and New Zealand lamb at all times -- these well-travelled foods have a carbon footprint the size of an SUV. But there is a burgeoning local food movement taking place in Canadian cities, farms and shops that is changing both the way we eat and the way we think about food.

Locavore describes how foodies,100-milers, urbanites, farmers, gardeners and chefs across Canada are creating a new local food order that has the potential to fight climate change and feed us all. Combining front-line reporting, shrewd analysis and passionate food writing to delight the gastronome, Locavore shows how the pieces of a post-industrial food system are being assembled into something infinitely better.

We meet city-dwellers who grow crops in their backyards and office workers who have traded their keyboards for pitchforks. We learn how a group of New Brunswick farmers saved the family farm, why artisanal cheese in Quebec is so popular and how a century-old farm survives in urban British Columbia, bordered by the ocean on one side and by a new housing development on the other. We follow food culture activists as they work to preserve the genetic material of heritage plants to return once-endangered flavours to our tables. In recounting the stories of its diverse cast of characters, Locavore lays out a blueprint for a local food revolution.

From Locavore
:At farmers’ markets across the city, heritage tomatoes, free-range eggs and organic purslane are sold out before noon.... And at the cheese shop, the rich but not-too-salty sheep’s milk feta made on the outskirts of Toronto is so popular I never know when I’ll find it again. Everywhere, it seems, demand outstrips supply for local produce.



Publisher: Toronto : HarperCollins, c2010
ISBN: 9781554684182
Characteristics: 240 p. ; 24 cm

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debwalker Jun 12, 2011

Sarah Elton was interviewed on Fresh Air this morning. It all started for her when her child brought home a birthday party cookie that was labelled Made in China. As she points out, something is seriously wrong with the world's food system when baked goods are imported from the other side of the planet.

t
tamaravh
Jun 09, 2011

I expected this book to give tips and tricks on how to become a locavore. Instead it is filled with stories from Canadian farmers to urbanites about how they are dealing with the challenges of global warming, rising food costs, etc.
Not what I was looking for but an interesting read none the less.

e
ekulka
Feb 28, 2011

A reasonable summary of the ideas behind "gardening on the backside of the calendar".

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