Seeing Red

Seeing Red

A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

eBook - 2011
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Seeing Red is a groundbreaking study of how Canadian English- language newspapers have portrayed Aboriginal peoples from 1869 to the present day. It assesses a wide range of publications on topics that include the sale of Rupert's Land, the signing of Treaty 3, the Northwest Rebellion and Louis Riel, the death of Pauline Johnson, the outing of Grey Owl, the discussions surrounding Bill C-31, the "Bended Elbow" standoff at Kenora, Ontario, and the Oka Crisis. The authors uncover overwhelming evidence that the colonial imaginary not only thrives but dominates depictions of Aboriginal peoples in mainstream newspapers. The colonial constructs ingrained in the news media perpetuate an imagined Native inferiority that contributes significantly to the marginalization of Indigenous people in Canada. That such imagery persists to this day suggests strongly that the country lives in denial, failing to live up to its boosterism of the cultural mosaic.

Seeing Red is a groundbreaking study of how Canadian English- language newspapers have portrayed Aboriginal peoples from 1869 to the present day. The authors uncover overwhelming evidence that the colonial imaginary not only thrives but dominates depictions of Aboriginal peoples in mainstream newspapers.


Book News
The authors (professors of history and art history at the U. of Regina, Canada) conduct a discourse analysis of how Canada's indigenous peoples have been portrayed in Canadian newspapers from the sale of Hudson's Bay Company lands to Canada in 1869 through to 2009, arguing that the newspapers have been and continue to be steered by the colonial imagery with respect to Canada's indigenous. They support this argument through examinations of how indigenous Canadians were represented in newspaper accounts of colonial land sales, the resistance struggles of Métis leader Louis Riel, the 1913 death of Canadian Native poet Pauline Johnson, native contributions to World War II, a 1974 aboriginal protest occupation of a park in the Ontario town of Kenora, and Bill C-31 of 1985 (which amended the Indian Act by barring certain discriminatory practices). Distributed in the US by Michigan State U. Press. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Publisher: Winnipeg, MB : University of Manitoba Press, ©2011
ISBN: 9780887554063
0887554067
0887554067
0887557279
9780887557279
Characteristics: 1 online resource (362 pages) : illustrations
Additional Contributors: Robertson, Carmen L. 1962-

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