Caravaggio's Eye

Caravaggio's Eye

Book - 2011
Rate this:
Baker & Taylor
"This book concentrates on a few crucial years of Caravaggio's development, in order to cast light on what made the artist such a revolutionary figure. It argues that this revolution was one of technique rather than style, and involved the sophisticated use of a camera obscura and so-called 'burning' or parabolic mirrors, exploiting new advances in glassmaking and optics. Because the results Caravaggio obtained by his new methods were so different he created a sensation, although these innovations were rapidly assimilated and the artistic establishment worked successfully to restore their way of doing things, so that the true novelty of his art in the 1590s has been obscured. Clovis Whitfield uses a lifetime of study of the period to discuss not only Caravaggio's technology but also his patronage and cultural context, the Rome of Clement VIII, concentrating particularly on Caravaggio's homosexual patron Cardinal Francesco Maria Del Monte and analysing the taste and role of his other early supporters as well. Whitfield's Caravaggio was the son of a bricklayer, untrained in traditional artistic disciplines, who instead took the dramatic step of painting exactly what he saw with his reproductive aids. Galileo's hypothesis drawn from observation and Caravaggio's novel description of what he saw were, according to Whitfield, parallel attempts to explain features of the many-layered reality that surrounds us."--Publisher description.

Univ of Washington Pr
This book concentrates on a few crucial years of Caravaggio’s development, in order to cast light on what made the artist such a revolutionary figure. It argues that this revolution was one of technique rather than style, and involved the sophisticated use of a camera obscura and so-called 'burning' or parabolic mirrors, exploiting new advances in glassmaking and optics. Because the results Caravaggio obtained by his new methods were so different he created a sensation, although these innovations were rapidly assimilated and the artistic establishment worked successfully to restore their way of doing things, so that the true novelty of his art in the 1590s has been obscured.Clovis Whitfield uses a lifetime of study of the period to discuss not only Caravaggio's technology but also his patronage and cultural context, the Rome of Clement VIII, concentrating particularly on Caravaggio's homosexual patron Cardinal Francesco Maria Del Monte and analysing the taste and role of his other early supporters as well. Whitfield's Caravaggio was the son of a bricklayer, untrained in traditional artistic disciplines, who instead took the dramatic step of painting exactly what he saw with his reproductive aids. Galileo’s hypothesis drawn from observation and Caravaggio’s novel description of what he saw were, according to Whitfield, parallel attempts to explain features of the many-layered reality that surrounds us. The book features remarkable new photographs and especially details of Caravaggio's paintings and those of his followers and rivals that will dramatically refresh hackneyed perceptions of this crucial figure and his world."This revolutionary book will transform studies of the renegade 'people's artist'." Art Quarterly, Spring 2012

Book News
"After centuries of neglect and blame for having merely imitated the reality around him, and for leading many young painters astray, Caravaggio was re-admitted to the category of artistic genius at the earliest some hundred years ago," states Whitfield, a London-based art historian and art dealer. This study examines the artist's life and work, as well as the mythology surrounding him and the rejection he received for using a camera obscura and other technology that allowed him to bypass the rigorous training demanded by the establishment. He was, in essence, a revolutionary. The volume is beautifully produced, oversize (10x12"), and richly illustrated. Distributed by Casemate. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Publisher: London, Eng. : Paul Holberton Publishing, 2011
ISBN: 9781907372100
Characteristics: 279 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 31 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...
No similar edition of this title was found at SPL.

Try searching for Caravaggio's Eye to see if SPL owns related versions of the work.


Suggest For Purchase

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top