Islamic Legal Orthodoxy

Islamic Legal Orthodoxy

Twelver Shiite Responses to the Sunni Legal System

eBook - 1998
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Stewart points to an underlying tension in Shi'ite intellectual history between assimilationist and nativist impulses in the debate over consensus, dissimulation, and in the lives of certain Shi'ite scholars who lived and studied among Sunnis.

One of the most far-reaching developments in the history of Islam was the rise of the four classic Sunni schools of law between the ninth and eleventh centuries CE. Consolidation of these schools went hand in hand with the establishment of jurists’ dominance over religious discourse and social institutions. Orthodoxy came to be defined as the consensus (ijma’) of the Sunni jurists. Devin Stewart argues that it is to the margins of the emerging system that investigators must look to understand its historical dynamics. The development of Twelve Shi’ite jurisprudence in relation and reaction to the Sunni schools is particularly informative.

In Islamic Legal Orthodoxy, Stewart explores the process by which Shi’ite jurists participated in the mainstream of Islamic jurisprudence and were influenced by Sunni legal doctrines. He identifies three main reactions to Sunni legal definitions of othodoxy and the concept of consensus on which it was based. The Akhbaris rejected Sunni legal consensus and juristic authority for a scripture-based system; many Shi’ite outwardly accepted the ground rules of Sunni legal consensus and joined the Shafi’i school of jurisprudence; a third option was to adopt the concept of consensus to create a “fifth,” Shi’ite, legal system.

The development of the Sunni legal system effectively set the ground rules for the marginal sect’s negotiation of their identity with respect to Islamic legal orthodoxy. Accordingly, Shi’ite jurists developed a legal institution that is structurally similar to the four Sunni madhhabs and even today serves as means to position themselves in the Muslim world. Stewart points to an underlying tension in Shi’ite intellectual history between assimilationist and nativist impulses in the debate over consensus, dissmulation (taqiyyah) and the lives of certain Shi’ite scholars who lived and studies among Sunnis.


Book News
A reading of Shiite jurisprudence that indicates the extent to which the consolidation of the Sunni madhhabs or schools of law, controlled the subsequent history of Islamic religious doctrine and institutions not only for the Sunni community but also for prominent marginal or minority groups such as the Shiites and the Kharijis. Finds that the orthodox Sunni legal system set the ground rules by which marginal sects negotiated their identity and place within the Muslim world. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Publisher: Salt Lake City : University of Utah Press, ©1998
ISBN: 9780585134376
0585134375
087480910X
9780874809107
Characteristics: 1 online resource (ix, 280 pages)

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