Deep Souths

Deep Souths

Delta, Piedmont, and Sea Island Society in the Age of Segregation

eBook - 2001
Average Rating:
Rate this:
1
Book News
Challenging the image of The South constructed by novels and movies during the 1930s and 1940s, Harris (history, U. of New Hampshire) offers a more complicated and vibrant portrait of the Mississippi Delta, the Georgia Piedmont, and the Georgia Sea Islands and the changes there over the course of a century. He draws on sources ranging from census records to oral histories, and describes how the three regions diverged during the three generations after Reconstruction. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Johns Hopkins University Press

Deep Souths tells the stories of three southern regions from Reconstruction to World War II: the Mississippi-Yazoo Delta, the eastern Piedmont of Georgia, and the Georgia Sea Islands and Atlantic coast. Though these regions initially shared the histories and populations we associate with the idea of a "Deep South"—all had economies based on slave plantation labor in 1860—their histories diverged sharply during the three generations after Reconstruction. With research gathered from oral histories, census reports, and a wide variety of other sources, Harris traces these regional changes in cumulative stories of individuals across the social spectrum. Deep Souths presents a comparative and ground-level view of history that challenges the idea that the lower South was either uniform or static in the era of segregation. By the end of the New Deal era, changes in these regions had prepared the way for the civil rights movement and the end of segregation.


"This book succeeds admirably in... show[ing] that far from being static during the years between Reconstruction and the Second World War, the southern states were rapidly changing... It would be hard to find a better ground-level account." -- Times Literary Supplement


Deep Souths tells the stories of three southern regions from Reconstruction to World War II: the Mississippi-Yazoo Delta, the eastern Piedmont of Georgia, and the Georgia Sea Islands and Atlantic coast. Though these regions initially shared the histories and populations we associate with the idea of a "Deep South"—all had economies based on slave plantation labor in 1860—their histories diverged sharply during the three generations after Reconstruction. With research gathered from oral histories, census reports, and a wide variety of other sources, Harris traces these regional changes in cumulative stories of individuals across the social spectrum.Deep Souths presents a comparative and ground-level view of history that challenges the idea that the lower South was either uniform or static in the era of segregation. By the end of the New Deal era, changes in these regions had prepared the way for the civil rights movement and the end of segregation.



Publisher: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001
ISBN: 9780801875816
0801875811
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xii, 454 pages, [26] pages of plates) : illustrations, maps

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment
c
Cabby
Dec 06, 2007

Finalist of the 2002 Pulitzer prize for history.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at SPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top