La Dolce Vita

La Dolce Vita

Downloadable Video - 1960
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Journalist and man-about-town Marcello struggles to find his place in the world, torn between the allure of Rome's elite social scene and the stifling domesticity offered by his girlfriend, all the while searching for a way to become a serious writer.
Publisher: [Italy]: , Films sans frontières (Firm) [distridutor], , [1960]
Copyright Date: ©1960
Characteristics: 1 online resource (1 video file (2 hr. 46 min. 48 sec.)) : sound, color
Alternative Title: Also released as: Sweet Life

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v
VonHafenstaaad
Aug 14, 2017

Fellini was such a master filmmaker. Along with Luchino Visconti, he had a brilliant camera eye and with La Dolce Vita he created an epic movie mural in wide screen. The luminous black and white cinematography enhances journalist Marcello's odyssey, his wanderings through the modern Rome of the late 50's, in broad daylight and in the inky nights (from St. Peter's Basilica to The Trevi Fountain ; from a prostitute's flooded basement apartment to a decadent orgy at film's end. The "Sweet Life" (english translation), every sequence a vignette woven into giant tapestry of greed and overindulgence. Over half a century later the film's power to shock many have dulled a bit, but this is still one of the great Italian movies of all time.

m
Maoisdead
Apr 20, 2017

Fellini was such a master filmmaker. Along with Luchino Visconti, he had a brilliant camera eye and with La Dolce Vita he created an epic movie mural in wide screen. The luminous black and white cinematography enhances journalist Marcello's odyssey, his wanderings through the modern Rome of the late 50's. The "Sweet Life" (english translation), every sequence a vignette woven into giant tapestry of greed and overindulgence. Over half a century later the film's power to shock many have dulled a bit, but this is still one of the great Italian movies of all time.

Marinetti Apr 20, 2017

La Dolce Vita is the outcome of a crossroads for Federico Fellini as Italian neo-realism influenced him prior making this film, Variety Lights (1950) and I Vitelloni (1953). After La Dolce Vita Fellini's creations became more extravagant and dreamlike as the films often became some sort of allegorical celebrations to mankind such as the autobiographical 8 ½ (1963) and dreamy Juliet of the Spirits (1965). This crossroad is heavily influenced by a search for something, maybe happiness, which is depicted through the main character, Marcello Rubini (Marcello Mastroianni), who drifts from day to day with no particular existential ambition.

d
davidyoder
Mar 26, 2017

A lot of foolish scenes and really difficult to understand the plot. Three hours of non-sense. It may take 2 or 3 good movies to forget this one.

l
lindy919
Mar 11, 2017

Another Federico Fellini film not worth the celluloid it was printed on.

v
vonnyb
Feb 01, 2016

It took four sittings for me to finish this film. I just couldn't get into it. Visually, it's lovely, but I didn't engage with the story or any of the characters. It's quite long at nearly three hours, which is a long time to watch a bunch of wealthy fools being foolish. Sexism abounds, which isn't surprising for a film from this era. The cover and the clips always show Anita Ekberg, but she's in the movie for all of 15 or 20 minutes.

s
salsabrarian
Apr 28, 2015

Gorgeous actresses and lush costuming...a visual feast even in black and white. Compelling but weird.

m
ms_mustard
Aug 23, 2013

reflective of its time but depressing. beautiful people, flying Jesus and Trevi Fountain scenes that have become iconic and the photographer's name, Paparazzo, that has become generic for the camera swarm. in the search for meaning and mutual pleasure the men get the nod and the women are labeled whores, sluts. shallowness reigns from 'intellectual' gatherings to a rowdy religious crowd's decimation of a 'holy' tree.

j
joseph
Mar 10, 2012

Good - La Dolce Vita (1960) 172 min. The film follows a journalist within a seven day period as he encounters others searching for anything that would make life meaningful. That search leads the journalist (played by Marcello Mastroianni) to either the self, others or God. In the end, the search represents life itself - we're always searching to our last breath and then... even beyond that. This is not a film for everyone - the film is episodic and may not seem to be going anywhere which is the point of the film - our search leads us to a point and then what? There's always more which is what makes the "Sweet Life". Not my favorite of the Fellini pictures and I stress, not for all tastes...but worth the watch.

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