The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity

The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity

eBook - 2000
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Chicago Distribution Center
Because pyrotechnology was considered a demeaning craft, there is very little about its practice in ancient texts; our knowledge of early developments is based almost entirely on interpretation of artifacts recovered by archaeology during the past century and a half. Literature in archaeology and anthropology, however, tends to concentrate on the artifact found rather than on how it was produced - on the pot or spearhead rather than the kiln or furnace. There is thus surprisingly little information on the practice and importance of pyrotechnology. The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity, written by an engineer with fifty years of experience in industrial research and pyrotechnology, rectifies this lack. J.E. Rehder covers the kinds of furnaces, the nature of the fuel used, and the productions created - fired clay, lime from limestone, metals from the reduction of ores, and glass from sand. He also shows convincingly that previous arguments that early deforestation resulted from furnace use cannot be supported. The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity provides much-needed information for anyone interested in archaeology, anthropology, and pyrotechnology.


David Brown Book Co
This unusual study, written by an engineer with expertise in industrial research and pyrotechnology, combines archaeological investigation with technical instruction to examine the scientific and chemical processes which resulted in the ancient furnace.
This unusual study, written by an engineer with expertise in industrial research and pyrotechnology, combines archaeological investigation with technical instruction to examine the scientific and chemical processes which resulted in the ancient furnace. The scope of the book is comprehensive and includes the successes and failures of over 10,000 years of history. Subjects include the use of fuels according to the products made, temperature control, deforestation and the smelting and use of copper and iron. This useful reference work contains varying amounts of technical language, with most jargon confined to the more detailed appendices, in order to make the subject matter more available to a wider readership.

McGill Queens Univ Pr
Because pyrotechnology was considered a demeaning craft, there is very little about its practice in ancient texts; our knowledge of early developments is based almost entirely on interpretation of artifacts recovered by archaeology during the past century and a half. Literature in archaeology and anthropology, however, tends to concentrate on the artifact found rather than on how it was produced - on the pot or spearhead rather than the kiln or furnace. There is thus surprisingly little information on the practice and importance of pyrotechnology. The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity, written by an engineer with fifty years of experience in industrial research and pyrotechnology, rectifies this lack. J.E. Rehder covers the kinds of furnaces, the nature of the fuel used, and the productions created - fired clay, lime from limestone, metals from the reduction of ores, and glass from sand. He also shows convincingly that previous arguments that early deforestation resulted from furnace use cannot be supported. The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity provides much-needed information for anyone interested in archaeology, anthropology, and pyrotechnology.

The material fabric of nearly all settled civilizations exists largely because of pyrotechnology - the generation, control, and application of the heat from fire to change the properties of materials. The technological achievements that make contemporary society possible, for instance, are the result of some ten thousand years of development of the intentional use of fire for other than warmth and food.

Because pyrotechnology was considered a demeaning craft, there is very little about its practice in ancient texts; our knowledge of early developments is based almost entirely on interpretation of artifacts recovered by archaeology during the past century and a half. Literature in archaeology and anthropology, however, tends to concentrate on the artifact found rather than on how it was produced - on the pot or spearhead rather than the kiln or furnace. There is thus surprisingly little information on the practice and importance of pyrotechnology. The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity, written by an engineer with fifty years of experience in industrial research and pyrotechnology, rectifies this lack. J.E. Rehder covers the kinds of furnaces, the nature of the fuel used, and the productions created - fired clay, lime from limestone, metals from the reduction of ores, and glass from sand. He also shows convincingly that previous arguments that early deforestation resulted from furnace use cannot be supported.The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity provides much-needed information for anyone interested in archaeology, anthropology, and pyrotechnology.
The material fabric of nearly all settled civilizations exists largely because of pyrotechnology - the generation, control, and application of the heat from fire to change the properties of materials. The technological achievements that make contemporary society possible, for instance, are the result of some ten thousand years of development of the intentional use of fire for other than warmth and food.

Publisher: Montreal, Que. : McGill-Queen's University Press, Ă2000
ISBN: 9780773568556
0773568557
0773530746
9780773530744
9780773520677
0773520678
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xix, 216 pages) : illustrations

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