The Theory and History of Ocean Boundary-making

The Theory and History of Ocean Boundary-making

eBook - 1988
Rate this:
Chicago Distribution Center
In the classical and neo-classical periods of international law, the law of the sea was chiefly concerned with the need to facilitate the movement of ships. In the post-World War II period, however, coastal states began to make juridictional claims to extensive areas of the ocean, requiring decisions on how ocean boundaries are to be established and maintained.

In this book Douglas Johnston provides a synthesis of all disciplines relevant to any aspect of boundary-making. He outlines the general theory of boundary-making, reviews the modern history of all modes of boundary-making in the ocean, and provides a theoretical framework for the analysis and evaluation of ocean boundary claims, practices, arrangements, and settlements. The author suggests that as bilateral treaty-making continues, significant boundary delimitation patterns will emerge, some of which may prove useful in non-oceanic contexts of boundary-making and natural resource management such as Antarctica, airspace and outerspace, and international lakes and rivers.


McGill Queens Univ Pr
In this book Douglas Johnston provides a synthesis of all disciplines relevant to any aspect of boundary-making. He outlines the general theory of boundary-making, reviews the modern history of all modes of boundary-making in the ocean, and provides a theoretical framework for the analysis and evaluation of ocean boundary claims, practices, arrangements, and settlements. The author suggests that as bilateral treaty-making continues, significant boundary delimitation patterns will emerge, some of which may prove useful in non-oceanic contexts of boundary-making and natural resource management such as Antarctica, airspace and outerspace, and international lakes and rivers.

In the classical and neo-classical periods of international law, the law of the sea was chiefly concerned with the need to facilitate the movement of ships. In the post-World War II period, however, coastal states began to make juridictional claims to extensive areas of the ocean, requiring decisions on how ocean boundaries are to be established and maintained.
In this book Douglas Johnston provides a synthesis of all disciplines relevant to any aspect of boundary-making. He outlines the general theory of boundary-making, reviews the modern history of all modes of boundary-making in the ocean, and provides a theoretical framework for the analysis and evaluation of ocean boundary claims, practices, arrangements, and settlements. The author suggests that as bilateral treaty-making continues, significant boundary delimitation patterns will emerge, some of which may prove useful in non-oceanic contexts of boundary-making and natural resource management such as Antarctica, airspace and outerspace, and international lakes and rivers.
In the classical and neo-classical periods of international law, the law of the sea was chiefly concerned with the need to facilitate the movement of ships. In the post-World War II period, however, coastal states began to make juridictional claims to extensive areas of the ocean, requiring decisions on how ocean boundaries are to be established and maintained.


Publisher: Kingston [Ont.] : McGill-Queen's University Press, Ä‚1988
ISBN: 9780773561489
077356148X
9780773506244
0773506241
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xiii, 445 pages) : maps

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at SPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top