Newfoundland in the North Atlantic World, 1929-1949

Newfoundland in the North Atlantic World, 1929-1949

eBook - 1988
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Neary draws material from both public and private sources in the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, and Newfoundland. Following a brief summary of major developments in Newfoundland before 1929, he gives an account of the tumultuous events that led to the demise of responsible self-government and the establishment of a British-appointed Commission of Government in 1934. He details and evaluates the major policies of the commission during three distinct phases: the continuing hard times of the 1930s, the boom years of the Second World War, and the period of post-war adjustment. The reasons for constitutional change are examined and Neary explains clearly why Newfoundland became a province of Canada in 1949. Through a fine blending of domestic and international history, he reveals the intricate connections between events in Newfoundland and in the rest of the North Atlantic World, providing a balanced view which takes into account constitutional, political, economic, and social developments. He acknowledges the role of British, Canadian, and American policymakers in determining the course of events in Newfoundland and illuminates the role that Newfoundlanders themselves played at a critical time in their history.


McGill Queens Univ Pr
Neary draws material from both public and private sources in the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, and Newfoundland. Following a brief summary of major developments in Newfoundland before 1929, he gives an account of the tumultuous events that led to the demise of responsible self-government and the establishment of a British-appointed Commission of Government in 1934. He details and evaluates the major policies of the commission during three distinct phases: the continuing hard times of the 1930s, the boom years of the Second World War, and the period of post-war adjustment. The reasons for constitutional change are examined and Neary explains clearly why Newfoundland became a province of Canada in 1949. Through a fine blending of domestic and international history, he reveals the intricate connections between events in Newfoundland and in the rest of the North Atlantic World, providing a balanced view which takes into account constitutional, political, economic, and social developments. He acknowledges the role of British, Canadian, and American policymakers in determining the course of events in Newfoundland and illuminates the role that Newfoundlanders themselves played at a critical time in their history.

The entry of Newfoundland into Canadian Confederation has been the subject of many books. But, until now, the history of the British-appointed commission which governed Newfoundland from 1934 to 1949 has not been given much attention. Peter Neary surveys the history of the commission and weighs the constitutional decision of 1949 against developments in Newfoundland during the preceding twenty years.

Neary draws material from both public and private sources in the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States, and Newfoundland. Following a brief summary of major developments in Newfoundland before 1929, he gives an account of the tumultuous events that led to the demise of responsible self-government and the establishment of a British-appointed Commission of Government in 1934. He details and evaluates the major policies of the commission during three distinct phases: the continuing hard times of the 1930s, the boom years of the Second World War, and the period of post-war adjustment. The reasons for constitutional change are examined and Neary explains clearly why Newfoundland became a province of Canada in 1949. Through a fine blending of domestic and international history, he reveals the intricate connections between events in Newfoundland and in the rest of the North Atlantic World, providing a balanced view which takes into account constitutional, political, economic, and social developments. He acknowledges the role of British, Canadian, and American policymakers in determining the course of events in Newfoundland and illuminates the role that Newfoundlanders themselves played at a critical time in their history.
The entry of Newfoundland into Canadian Confederation has been the subject of many books. But, until now, the history of the British-appointed commission which governed Newfoundland from 1934 to 1949 has not been given much attention. Peter Neary surveys the history of the commission and weighs the constitutional decision of 1949 against developments in Newfoundland during the preceding twenty years.

Publisher: Kingston, Ont. : McGill-Queen's University Press, Ă1988
ISBN: 9780773561809
0773561803
0773506683
9780773506688
0773515186
9780773515185
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xi, 459 pages, [16] pages of plates) : illustrations, map, portraits

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