Making Knowledge Count

Making Knowledge Count

Advocacy and Social Science

eBook - 1991
Rate this:
Chicago Distribution Center
The essays in this collection use case studies to address four vital issues of modern social advocacy. The first is the new social framework which has legitimized advocacy and recognized the immense importance of human rights legislation. The second issue explored is the adoption of various strategies by advocates in empowering social groups to achieve better self-management. A third issue is the link between the process of advocacy and social movements. In the past the sociological study of collective conflict focused on the confrontation between capital and labour, but in recent years social movements have shifted the focus to quality of life or "programmed society" conflicts. Fourth, the essays examine the role of academic social science in the new process of advocacy. Harries-Jones and the other contributors propose that outdated notions of objectivity in the social sciences be replaced by reflexiveness, social commitment, and interested knowledge. The case studies of advocacy in this collection include those concerning human rights in Chile, race relations, refugees, community and labour advocacy, alternative work training, and advocacy in the women's movement. The contributors to this volume are Howard Adelman, Jinny Arancibia, Marcelo Charlin, John Cleveland, Stewart Crysdale, Harry Diaz, Don Dippo, Jacques Doyer, Peter Harries-Jones, Elspeth Heyworth, Peter Landstreet, Ronnie Leah, Stan Marshall, Gareth Morgan, Tim Rees, Metta Spencer, and Carol Tator.

Largely due to the impact of human rights legislation, especially in Canada, the radical dissent of the 1960s has been replaced by the more co-operative framework of social advocacy. Political activity is no longer necessarily radical or rooted in social class but instead expresses broad themes of cultural aspiration. Consequently, social activists and social scientists need a new understanding of the role of dissent in society. Peter Harries-Jones and the contributing authors provide that understanding in Making Knowledge Count.


McGill Queens Univ Pr
Largely due to the impact of human rights legislation, especially in Canada, the radical dissent of the 1960s has been replaced by the more co-operative framework of social advocacy. Political activity is no longer necessarily radical or rooted in social class but instead expresses broad themes of cultural aspiration. Consequently, social activists and social scientists need a new understanding of the role of dissent in society. Peter Harries-Jones and the contributing authors provide that understanding in Making Knowledge Count.
Largely due to the impact of human rights legislation, especially in Canada, the radical dissent of the 1960s has been replaced by the more co-operative framework of social advocacy. Political activity is no longer necessarily radical or rooted in social class but instead expresses broad themes of cultural aspiration. Consequently, social activists and social scientists need a new understanding of the role of dissent in society. Peter Harries-Jones and the contributing authors provide that understanding in Making Knowledge Count.

The essays in this collection use case studies to address four vital issues of modern social advocacy. The first is the new social framework which has legitimized advocacy and recognized the immense importance of human rights legislation. The second issue explored is the adoption of various strategies by advocates in empowering social groups to achieve better self-management. A third issue is the link between the process of advocacy and social movements. In the past the sociological study of collective conflict focused on the confrontation between capital and labour, but in recent years social movements have shifted the focus to quality of life or "programmed society" conflicts. Fourth, the essays examine the role of academic social science in the new process of advocacy. Harries-Jones and the other contributors propose that outdated notions of objectivity in the social sciences be replaced by reflexiveness, social commitment, and interested knowledge. The case studies of advocacy in this collection include those concerning human rights in Chile, race relations, refugees, community and labour advocacy, alternative work training, and advocacy in the women's movement. The contributors to this volume are Howard Adelman, Jinny Arancibia, Marcelo Charlin, John Cleveland, Stewart Crysdale, Harry Diaz, Don Dippo, Jacques Doyer, Peter Harries-Jones, Elspeth Heyworth, Peter Landstreet, Ronnie Leah, Stan Marshall, Gareth Morgan, Tim Rees, Metta Spencer, and Carol Tator.

The essays in this collection use case studies to address four vital issues of modern social advocacy. The first is the new social framework which has legitimized advocacy and recognized the immense importance of human rights legislation. The second issue explored is the adoption of various strategies by advocates in empowering social groups to achieve better self-management. A third issue is the link between the process of advocacy and social movements. In the past the sociological study of collective conflict focused on the confrontation between capital and labour, but in recent years social movements have shifted the focus to quality of life or "programmed society" conflicts. Fourth, the essays examine the role of academic social science in the new process of advocacy.Harries-Jones and the other contributors propose that outdated notions of objectivity in the social sciences be replaced by reflexiveness, social commitment, and interested knowledge. The case studies of advocacy in this collection include those concerning human rights in Chile, race relations, refugees, community and labour advocacy, alternative work training, and advocacy in the women's movement.The contributors to this volume are Howard Adelman, Jinny Arancibia, Marcelo Charlin, John Cleveland, Stewart Crysdale, Harry Diaz, Don Dippo, Jacques Doyer, Peter Harries-Jones, Elspeth Heyworth, Peter Landstreet, Ronnie Leah, Stan Marshall, Gareth Morgan, Tim Rees, Metta Spencer, and Carol Tator.

Publisher: Montrâeal [Que.] : McGill-Queen's University Press, Ă1991
ISBN: 9780773562783
0773562788
9780773508194
0773508198
Characteristics: 1 online resource (250 pages)
Additional Contributors: Harries-Jones, Peter 1937-

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at SPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top