John Clare and the Bounds of Circumstance

John Clare and the Bounds of Circumstance

eBook - 1987
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As a working-class poet, born in 1793 to an impovisherished family in rural England, John Clare has often been considered of interest for the unusual nature of his life and career rather than for his poetry. In this book, Johanne Clare argues that he should be taken seriously both as a poet and as a representative figure in a period of social and agrarian upheaval. She discusses Clare's political attitudes and his views on the social issues which most affected him - poverty, economic inequality, class prejudice, and the enclosure movement - and shows how his social identity and experience were intricately related to his major writings.

The author suggests that the full significance of Clare's contribution to English literature is found not in his social criticism, but in his refusal to dissociate himself from his past or to become assimilated into the mainstream of English culture at the expense of his class-identity. She argues that a clear set of aesthetic principles informs his finest work and provides the first thematic and structural classification of his poetry. Focussing on the major vocational poems and selected passages from the prose, she shows how Clare formulated the creative ideas and rhetorical techniques that allowed him to give unified expression to both his social and literary concerns. Clare's deep involvement with nature and rural England was not only the basis for his poetry, but also enabled him to articulate beliefs which opposed the inhumane values of his time.


McGill Queens Univ Pr
As a working-class poet, born in 1793 to an impovisherished family in rural England, John Clare has often been considered of interest for the unusual nature of his life and career rather than for his poetry. In this book, Johanne Clare argues that he should be taken seriously both as a poet and as a representative figure in a period of social and agrarian upheaval. She discusses Clare's political attitudes and his views on the social issues which most affected him - poverty, economic inequality, class prejudice, and the enclosure movement - and shows how his social identity and experience were intricately related to his major writings.

The author suggests that the full significance of Clare's contribution to English literature is found not in his social criticism, but in his refusal to dissociate himself from his past or to become assimilated into the mainstream of English culture at the expense of his class-identity. She argues that a clear set of aesthetic principles informs his finest work and provides the first thematic and structural classification of his poetry. Focussing on the major vocational poems and selected passages from the prose, she shows how Clare formulated the creative ideas and rhetorical techniques that allowed him to give unified expression to both his social and literary concerns. Clare's deep involvement with nature and rural England was not only the basis for his poetry, but also enabled him to articulate beliefs which opposed the inhumane values of his time.

As a working-class poet, born in 1793 to an impovisherished family in rural England, John Clare has often been considered of interest for the unusual nature of his life and career rather than for his poetry. In this book, Johanne Clare argues that he should be taken seriously both as a poet and as a representative figure in a period of social and agrarian upheaval. She discusses Clare's political attitudes and his views on the social issues which most affected him - poverty, economic inequality, class prejudice, and the enclosure movement - and shows how his social identity and experience were intricately related to his major writings.
The author suggests that the full significance of Clare's contribution to English literature is found not in his social criticism, but in his refusal to dissociate himself from his past or to become assimilated into the mainstream of English culture at the expense of his class-identity. She argues that a clear set of aesthetic principles informs his finest work and provides the first thematic and structural classification of his poetry. Focussing on the major vocational poems and selected passages from the prose, she shows how Clare formulated the creative ideas and rhetorical techniques that allowed him to give unified expression to both his social and literary concerns. Clare's deep involvement with nature and rural England was not only the basis for his poetry, but also enabled him to articulate beliefs which opposed the inhumane values of his time.

Publisher: Kingston [Ont.] : McGill-Queen's University Press, Ă1987
ISBN: 9780773561397
0773561390
9780773506060
0773506063
Characteristics: data file,rda
1 online resource (xiii, 217 pages)

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