Thomas Attwood

Thomas Attwood

The Biography of A Radical

eBook - 1990
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In addition to his political activities, Attwood laid claim to competence as an economist, based on his experience in banking and his observation of industrial practices in Birmingham. He focused most of his attention on the gold standard and its inhibitory effect on the growth of the economy. Long before the development of modern schools of economic theory, Attwood sought the regulation of business through control of the money supply. He was unsuccessful in his challenge to the Ricardian school, which promised stability through a gold based economy, and died disillusioned. Birmingham became identified with his brand of economic theory and a succession of economists followed his lead into the national arena. Through his study of Attwood's career and the development of his philosophy, David Moss reveals the impact of industrialism on the individual and society.

Thomas Attwood (1783-1856), a Birmingham banker, played a prominent role in many of the important controversies in England during the first half of the nineteenth century. He wrote and published extensively, appeared as a witness before three Parliamentary committees, held a seat in the House of Commons for seven years, and earned a reputation as one of the most accomplished out-door orators of the time. In 1830-32 his leadership of the middle and working classes in the provinces allowed him to negotiate directly with the government on the question of parliamentary reform. Attwood was representative and spokesman for the new industrial towns before they achieved political influence in keeping with their economic strength; the philosophy and technique he brought to bear on the major questions of the era came, almost exclusively, from this source. Although Attwood was not alone in speaking for his economic sector, more than anyone else he became its symbol.


McGill Queens Univ Pr
In addition to his political activities, Attwood laid claim to competence as an economist, based on his experience in banking and his observation of industrial practices in Birmingham. He focused most of his attention on the gold standard and its inhibitory effect on the growth of the economy. Long before the development of modern schools of economic theory, Attwood sought the regulation of business through control of the money supply. He was unsuccessful in his challenge to the Ricardian school, which promised stability through a gold based economy, and died disillusioned. Birmingham became identified with his brand of economic theory and a succession of economists followed his lead into the national arena. Through his study of Attwood's career and the development of his philosophy, David Moss reveals the impact of industrialism on the individual and society.

Thomas Attwood (1783-1856), a Birmingham banker, played a prominent role in many of the important controversies in England during the first half of the nineteenth century. He wrote and published extensively, appeared as a witness before three Parliamentary committees, held a seat in the House of Commons for seven years, and earned a reputation as one of the most accomplished out-door orators of the time. In 1830-32 his leadership of the middle and working classes in the provinces allowed him to negotiate directly with the government on the question of parliamentary reform. Attwood was representative and spokesman for the new industrial towns before they achieved political influence in keeping with their economic strength; the philosophy and technique he brought to bear on the major questions of the era came, almost exclusively, from this source. Although Attwood was not alone in speaking for his economic sector, more than anyone else he became its symbol.

In addition to his political activities, Attwood laid claim to competence as an economist, based on his experience in banking and his observation of industrial practices in Birmingham. He focused most of his attention on the gold standard and its inhibitory effect on the growth of the economy. Long before the development of modern schools of economic theory, Attwood sought the regulation of business through control of the money supply. He was unsuccessful in his challenge to the Ricardian school, which promised stability through a gold based economy, and died disillusioned. Birmingham became identified with his brand of economic theory and a succession of economists followed his lead into the national arena. Through his study of Attwood's career and the development of his philosophy, David Moss reveals the impact of industrialism on the individual and society.
Thomas Attwood (1783-1856), a Birmingham banker, played a prominent role in many of the important controversies in England during the first half of the nineteenth century. He wrote and published extensively, appeared as a witness before three Parliamentary committees, held a seat in the House of Commons for seven years, and earned a reputation as one of the most accomplished out-door orators of the time. In 1830-32 his leadership of the middle and working classes in the provinces allowed him to negotiate directly with the government on the question of parliamentary reform. Attwood was representative and spokesman for the new industrial towns before they achieved political influence in keeping with their economic strength; the philosophy and technique he brought to bear on the major questions of the era came, almost exclusively, from this source. Although Attwood was not alone in speaking for his economic sector, more than anyone else he became its symbol.

Publisher: Montreal [Que.] : McGill-Queen's University Press, Ă1990
ISBN: 9780773562080
0773562087
0773507086
9780773507081
Characteristics: 1 online resource (377 pages) : illustrations, portraits

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