Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War

Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War

eBook - 2004
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Univ of Toronto Pr

A major theme emerging from Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War is that many issues associated with the Cold War in Canada actually preceded World War II and continue to haunt us today.


The essays in Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War present a Cold War different in many respects from the familiar one of anti-communist hysteria. In Canada, the Cold War raised issues of national self-representation that went beyond international political tensions related to capitalistic versus communistic regimes. If the discourse of the Cold War in Canada was anti-communist, it was also anti-American in many ways. Drawing on a number of disciplinary approaches and examining what Michel Foucault called the 'discursive' practices of the period, the contributors examine how, in the Cold War, the personal became the political through the state's attempt to regulate sexuality - in pulp fiction, in film, and in public spaces.

A major theme emerging from Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War is that many issues associated with the Cold War in Canada actually preceded World War II and continue to haunt us today. This has become particularly apparent after the terrorist attacks of September 2001, when politicians began employing the rhetoric of the 'War on Terror' and invoking issues of border security, immigration and refugee quotas, and 'harmonization' of policies.


The essays in Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War present a Cold War different in many respects from the familiar one of anti-communist hysteria. In Canada, the Cold War raised issues of national self-representation that went beyond international political tensions related to capitalistic versus communistic regimes. If the discourse of the Cold War in Canada was anti-communist, it was also anti-American in many ways. Drawing on a number of disciplinary approaches and examining what Michel Foucault called the 'discursive' practices of the period, the contributors examine how, in the Cold War, the personal became the political through the state's attempt to regulate sexuality ? in pulp fiction, in film, and in public spaces.

A major theme emerging from Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War is that many issues associated with the Cold War in Canada actually preceded World War II and continue to haunt us today. This has become particularly apparent after the terrorist attacks of September 2001, when politicians began employing the rhetoric of the 'War on Terror' and invoking issues of border security, immigration and refugee quotas, and 'harmonization' of policies.



Book News
Seven essays, developed from presentations at a 2000-2001 lecture series at the University of British Columbia, present a view of the Cold War that differs in many respects from the anti-communist hysteria south of the border. From a wide range of disciplines, they explore political phenomena in terms of personal ones. The topics include the security state and organized religion, sexual regulation and resistance, and lesbianism as obscenity. There is no index. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

University of Toronto Press

The essays in Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War present a Cold War different in many respects from the familiar one of anti-communist hysteria. In Canada, the Cold War raised issues of national self-representation that went beyond international political tensions related to capitalistic versus communistic regimes. If the discourse of the Cold War in Canada was anti-communist, it was also anti-American in many ways. Drawing on a number of disciplinary approaches and examining what Michel Foucault called the 'discursive' practices of the period, the contributors examine how, in the Cold War, the personal became the political through the state's attempt to regulate sexuality – in pulp fiction, in film, and in public spaces.

A major theme emerging from Love, Hate, and Fear in Canada's Cold War is that many issues associated with the Cold War in Canada actually preceded World War II and continue to haunt us today. This has become particularly apparent after the terrorist attacks of September 2001, when politicians began employing the rhetoric of the 'War on Terror' and invoking issues of border security, immigration and refugee quotas, and 'harmonization' of policies.



Publisher: Toronto, Ont. : University of Toronto Press, Ă2004
ISBN: 9781282022911
1282022911
9781442676831
1442676833
9780802085009
9780802036766
0802085008
0802036767
Characteristics: 1 online resource (vi, 216 pages) : illustrations
Additional Contributors: Cavell, Richard 1949-

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