The Politics of Nationalism in Canada

The Politics of Nationalism in Canada

Cultural Conflict Since 1760

eBook - 2001
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Univ of Toronto Pr

David Chennells offers a provocative assessment of two hundred and forty years of nationalism in Canada, focusing on the evolution of the political process and the balance of power between state elites and ordinary citizens.


Surveying the past two hundred and forty years of Canadian political and constitutional history, David Chennells offers a provocative assessment of nationalism in Canada. Placing contemporary nationalism in historical perspective, the author explores the politics of nationalism and proposes a new theory of exclusive nationalism.

While other theories have tended to emphasize the coalescence of distinct languages and nationalities, or the rise of ethnic competition, Chennells' theory focuses instead on the evolution of the political process itself, arguing that the balance of power between state elites and ordinary citizens is a key determinant of the strength of exclusive nationalism. In the process he also addresses such questions as: How has cultural conflict been managed in the Canadian experience? How should liberals view exclusive nationalism? What is the place of large-scale historical surveys, and what are the appropriate methods for them? In tracing the causes of one of the most significant political phenomena of our time, Chennells points to changes in the pattern of political representation and to the paradoxically illiberal effects of popular mobilization. He explores many compelling examples of broad-minded, tolerant statecraft, but does not shrink from difficult and even controversial conclusions. Pronouncing exclusive nationalism illiberal, and existing theories incomplete, Chennells challenges many popular interpretations of key events in Canadian political history.



Book News
Chennells, a Ph.D. candidate at Cambridge U., focuses on the evolution of Canada's political process to assess the ebb and flow of exclusive nationalism, or nationalism that caters to a single linguistic, cultural, or religious group. He argues that the extent of influence that exclusive nationalism has held over Canadians at various times has been related to the capacity of the political elites to manage conflict. At key points, he suggests, popular mobilization and procedural shifts to more direct forms of representation have limited the capacity of political elites to treat diverse groups even- handedly, opening the door to official, exclusivist efforts at imposing particular national ways of life. Chennells also explores the implications for conflict regulation in contemporary Canada. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

University of Toronto Press

Surveying the past two hundred and forty years of Canadian political and constitutional history, David Chennells offers a provocative assessment of nationalism in Canada. Placing contemporary nationalism in historical perspective, the author explores the politics of nationalism and proposes a new theory of exclusive nationalism.

While other theories have tended to emphasize the coalescence of distinct languages and nationalities, or the rise of ethnic competition, Chennells' theory focuses instead on the evolution of the political process itself, arguing that the balance of power between state elites and ordinary citizens is a key determinant of the strength of exclusive nationalism. In the process he also addresses such questions as: How has cultural conflict been managed in the Canadian experience? How should liberals view exclusive nationalism? What is the place of large-scale historical surveys, and what are the appropriate methods for them? In tracing the causes of one of the most significant political phenomena of our time, Chennells points to changes in the pattern of political representation and to the paradoxically illiberal effects of popular mobilization. He explores many compelling examples of broad-minded, tolerant statecraft, but does not shrink from difficult and even controversial conclusions. Pronouncing exclusive nationalism illiberal, and existing theories incomplete, Chennells challenges many popular interpretations of key events in Canadian political history.

Publisher: Toronto [Ont.] : University of Toronto Press, Ă2001
ISBN: 9781442678613
1442678615
9780802042248
0802042244
Characteristics: 1 online resource (x, 381 pages)

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